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Add this “Miracle Tree” Into Your Diet

Native to parts of Africa and Asia, moringa, also known as the “miracle” tree is a true nutritional powerhouse. It is packed with 25 bio-available vitamins and minerals, 47 active antioxidants, 36 anti-inflammatories, and all eight essential amino acids.

When compared pound-for-pound, moringa contains seven times the vitamin C found in oranges, four times the vitamin A of carrots, four times the calcium of milk, three times potassium of bananas, and essential minerals such as zinc and iron.

The main antioxidants found in moringa include vitamin C, quercetin and chlorogenic acid. These antioxidants have been shown to slow cells’ absorption of sugar, and animal studies have found it to lower blood sugar levels.

As noted in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention:

“The leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree have been reported to demonstrate antioxidant activity due to its high amount of polyphenols.

“Moringa oleifera extracts of both mature and tender leaves exhibit strong antioxidant activity against free radicals, prevent oxidative damage to major biomolecules, and give significant protection against oxidative damage.”

The ability to combat oxidative damage is critical to warding off disease. But fighting dangerous inflammation in the body may be even more important.

The isothiocyanates, flavonoids and phenolic acids in moringa have anti-inflammatory benefits.

The tree’s strong anti-inflammatory action is traditionally used to treat stomach ulcers. Moringa oil (sometimes called Ben oil) has been shown to protect the liver from chronic inflammation. The oil is unique in that, unlike most vegetable oils, moringa resists rancidity.

This quality makes it a good preservative for foods that can spoil quickly. This sweet oil is used for both frying or in a salad dressing. It is also used topically to treat antifungal problems, arthritis, and is an excellent skin moisturizer.

In addition, moringa offers a wide range of other health benefits.

  • This miracle tree has been shown to have many positive effects on the body, from the inside out.

  • Moringa is an immunity-boosting powerhouse. Daily consumption of moringa as part of the diet improves body’s natural defenses against disease and can help keep you from getting sick.

  • Certain elements of moringa have been shown to help cure ovarian cancer, kidney stones and inflammations. Moringa enables the body to flush out calcium and phosphates from kidneys more efficiently.

  • Moringa leaves contain sulphur. This mineral is present in every single cell of the body and is the key ingredient for collagen and keratin. Collagen is an elastic substance that gives flexibility and softness to the skin, and keratin is a rigid substance which gives the skin rigidity and strength. These two substances form the majority of skin tissue and are made up of proteins constructed from this sulphur.

  • Moringa has been found to possess anti-aging properties. The effect of free radicals on human skin causes the appearance of wrinkles and makes the skin aged and less-resistant to lines. Moringa cleanses the liver and kidneys, which helps in purifying skin cells of free radicals and restoring the vitality and youthful complexion of the skin.

  • Arsenic contamination of food and water is a problem in many parts of the world. Several studies of mice and rats show that the leaves and seeds of Moringa oleifera may protect against some effects of arsenic toxicity.

Overall, moringa is a no-brainer to add into your diet. Just from a pure nutrient standpoint, it’s one of the most-nutritious foods on earth and can benefit your health in many positive ways.

Generally, you can find moringa in powder form and add it to water or combine it with other natural herbs, powders and foods in a healthy smoothie or shake.

Brands we have researched include Moringa Source, Organic Veda and Kiva, all of which the USDA has certified as organic.

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