BLACK FRIDAY SALE:  Save Up to 57% OFF! No Coupon Needed

Top 8 Benefits of CoQ10 For Aging Men

CoQ10 is one of the most popular nutritional supplements in history and for good reason. This nutrient plays a crucial in how well or not well your mitochondria function.

Remember, the mitochondria are the biological “powerplants” that produce the energy every cell in your body needs to survive.

The process by which your mitochondria create energy goes like this:

Food is turned into electrons, which mitochondria turn into ATP…

Also known as your the body’s “energy currency.”

CoQ10 is the essential enzyme within the mitochondria that jumpstarts this process.

If you think of the mitochondria as little energy engines, which turn electrons into energy…
CoQ10 is like the mitochondria’s ignition switch.

It’s what tells your mitochondria that it’s time to start turning out more energy.

No other substance will substitute for CoQ10 either.

Without CoQ10 there is no ignition and therefore no energy for the rest of the body to use.

Knowing the basics of CoQ10, I want to share with you the top eight benefits of you can recieve from taking a CoQ10 supplement.

CoQ10 Benefit #1: Energy Enhancement

Because CoQ10 plays an essential role in how much or how little energy your mitochondria produce, the first big benefits of supplementing with CoQ10 comes in the form of energy enhancement.

CoQ10 increases the size of the mitochondria by over 200%.

CoQ10 has been shown to increase your body’s “energy currency” ATP by up to 90%!

In healthy subjects, 300mg of CoQ10 was shown to decrease fatigue levels by up to 33%.

CoQ10 Benefit #2: A Healthy Aging Staple

CoQ10 levels in the body peak early in life; around age 20. After that, they decline for the rest of life…plummeting 6-7 times lower by age 80.

It’s no wonder research shows when CoQ10 levels fall, mitochondrial dysfunction skyrockets, and aging is accelerated. Or why CoQ10 is found to activate genes that are connected with healthier aging.

CoQ10 Benefit #3: Supports Heart Health

CoQ10 is found throughout the entire body, but nowhere more than in the heart. Without energy from CoQ10, the heart begins to “tire”, resulting in less blood flow, irregular beating, and dangerous thickening of the artery walls.

Taking 200 mg of CoQ10 is shown to improve heart function, irregular heartbeat, reduce heart wall thickness.

CoQ10 Benefit #4: Reduces Blood Pressure

CoQ10 is found throughout the entire body, but nowhere more than in the heart. Without energy from CoQ10, the heart begins to “tire”, resulting in less blood flow, irregular beating, and dangerous thickening of the artery walls.

Taking 200 mg of CoQ10 is shown to improve heart function, irregular heartbeat, reduce heart wall thickness.

CoQ10 Benefit #5: Fights the Fires of Inflammation

Inflammation is a key factor in how well or not well we age. It’s connected to everything from joint pain, mental fatigue, to hair loss.

In a meta-analysis of 17 studies researchers concluded that CoQ10 plummeted levels of CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α – the major indictors of inflammation.

CoQ10 Benefit #6: Keeps Blood Sugar In Check

Out of control blood sugar leads to a problem’s like weight gain and fatigue.

A meta-analysis of 14 studies found that CoQ10 significantly reduces blood sugar (fasting and HbA1c) and insulin levels at doses of 200mg a day.

CoQ10 Benefit #7: Preserve Muscle Mass

Your body uses antioxidants to combat free radicals. Free radicals are unstable particles that are created as a result of millions of chemical reactions in the body. They can cause oxidative stress and damage on a cellular level.

CoQ10 is shown to preserve muscle mass through its potent antioxidant power. Plus, low levels of CoQ10 are directly correlated to lower levels of muscle mass.

CoQ10 Benefit #8: Protects Cognitive Power

No organ or muscle uses more energy than the brain…so as you may guess CoQ10 is absolutely critical for proper cognitive function.

By slowing damage from foreign invaders, CoQ10 is proven to reduce destructive toxins in brain cells.

CoQ10’s Biggest Problem Is Bioavailability

PROBLEM #1 Extremely Sensitive to Oxygen, Light, & Heat

If exposed to outside oxygen, heat, or light CoQ10 spoils like a glass of milk left out overnight …

PROBLEM #2 Difficult For The Body To Absorb ​

CoQ10 is extremely difficult for the body to absorb because it’s not able to cross the gut barrier.  In fact, research shows less than 6% of regular CoQ10 makes it through the gastro-intestinal tract and into the blood.

PROBLEM #3 Too Big To Make It Into Cells

If…and that’s a big if… CoQ10 gets through the intestinal tract and into the blood stream… There’s still little chance it actually makes it into cells where it can work it’s magic.

You see, CoQ10 is a massive molecule. Trying to fit CoQ10 into  cells is like trying to park a school bus in a one car garage… It just doesn’t work!

We Found The Solution

Since ordinary CoQ10 is poorly absorbed, it must be made into a form that can survive harsh heat and light exposure, penetrate through the gut barrier, all while being small enough to make it into the cells.

That’s why we created Ouro CoQ10.

Using patent-pending, 3 phase absorption technology, Ouro CoQ10 is clinically proven to increase levels of CoQ10 100% higher than ordinary CoQ10.

Even better, Ouro CoQ10 starts working after the very first dose…

Boosting CoQ10 levels in the blood as high 160% within just six hours!

Ouro CoQ10 comes in a special encapsulation that protects your precious CoQ10 and combines it with other ingredients like “D-Limonene” to make sure CoQ10 is successfully delivered to the cells.

Simply click this link here for all the crucial details. 

Share This Article
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x

Mito Male Scientific References

1. Cavallini, G., Caracciolo, S., Vitali, G., Modenini, F., & Biagiotti, G. (2004). Carnitine versus androgen administration in the treatment of sexual dysfunction, depressed mood, and fatigue associated with male aging. Urology, 63(4), 641-646. doi:10.1016/j.urology.2003.11.009

2. Malaguarnera, M., Cammalleri, L., Gargante, M. P., Vacante, M., Colonna, V., & Motta, M. (2007). L-Carnitine treatment reduces severity of physical and mental fatigue and increases cognitive functions in centenarians: A randomized and controlled clinical trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(6), 1738-1744. doi:10.1093/ajcn/86.5.1738

3. Karlic, H., & Lohninger, A. (2004). Supplementation of l-carnitine in athletes: Does it make sense? Nutrition, 20(7-8), 709-715. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2004.04.003


4. Samimi, M., Jamilian, M., Ebrahimi, F. A., Rahimi, M., Tajbakhsh, B., & Asemi, Z. (2016). Oral carnitine supplementation reduces body weight and insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Clinical Endocrinology,84(6), 851-857. doi:10.1111/cen.13003


5. Sahlin, K. (2011). Boosting fat burning with carnitine: An old friend comes out from the shadow. The Journal of Physiology, 589(7), 1509-1510. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2011.205815


6. Soczynska, J. K., Kennedy, S. H., Chow, C. S., Woldeyohannes, H. O., Konarski, J. Z., & Mcintyre, R. S. (2008). Acetyl-L-carnitine and α-lipoic acid: Possible neurotherapeutic agents for mood disorders? Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, 17(6), 827-843. doi:10.1517/13543784.17.6.827


7. Miyagawa, T., Kawamura, H., Obuchi, M., Ikesaki, A., Ozaki, A., Tokunaga, K., . . . Honda, M. (2013). Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Administration in Narcolepsy Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Cross-Over and Placebo-Controlled Trial. PLoS ONE,8(1). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053707


8. Cristofano, A., Sapere, N., Marca, G. L., Angiolillo, A., Vitale, M., Corbi, G., . . . Costanzo, A. D. (2016). Serum Levels of Acyl-Carnitines along the Continuum from Normal to Alzheimers Dementia. Plos One, 11(5). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0155694

. Fillit, H., & Hill, J. (2004). The Economic Benefits of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Patients with Alzheimer Disease and Associated Dementias. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders,18. doi:10.1097/01.wad.0000127492.65032.d3


10. Miyata, M., Yoshihisa, A., Yamauchi, H., Owada, T., Sato, T., Suzuki, S., . . . Takeishi, Y. (2014). Impact of sleep-disordered breathing on myocardial damage and metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure. Heart and Vessels, 30(3), 318-324. doi:10.1007/s00380-014-0479-6


11. Lango, R. (2001). Influence of ?-carnitine and its derivatives on myocardial metabolism and function in ischemic heart disease and during cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiovascular Research, 51(1), 21-29. doi:10.1016/s0008-6363(01)00313-3


12. Vescovo, G., Ravara, B., Gobbo, V., Sandri, M., Angelini, A., Barbera, M. D., . . . Libera, L. D. (2002). L-Carnitine: A potential treatment for blocking apoptosis and preventing skeletal muscle myopathy in heart failure. American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology, 283(3). doi:10.1152/ajpcell.00046.2002


13. Shadboorestan, A., Shokrzadeh, M., Ahangar, N., Abdollahi, M., Omidi, M., & Payam, S. S. (2013). The chemoprotective effects of l-carnitine against genotoxicity induced by diazinon in rat blood lymphocyte. Toxicology and Industrial Health,31(12), 1334-1340. doi:10.1177/0748233713491811


14. Chowanadisai, W., Bauerly, K. A., Tchaparian, E., Wong, A., Cortopassi, G. A., & Rucker, R. B. (2009). Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis through cAMP Response Element-binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increased PGC-1α Expression. Journal of Biological Chemistry,285(1), 142-152. doi:10.1074/jbc.m109.030130


15. Chowanadisai, W., Bauerly, K. A., Tchaparian, E., Wong, A., Cortopassi, G. A., & Rucker, R. B. (2009). Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis through cAMP Response Element-binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increased PGC-1α Expression. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 285(1), 142-152. doi:10.1074/jbc.m109.030130


16. Stites TE, Mitchell AE, Rucker RB. Physiological importance of quinoenzymes and the O-quinone family of cofactors. J Nutr. 2000 Apr;130(4):719-27
17. Steinberg, F., Stites, T. E., Anderson, P., Storms, D., Chan, I., Eghbali, S., & Rucker, R. (2003). Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Improves Growth and Reproductive Performance in Mice Fed Chemically Defined Diets. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 228(2), 160-166. doi:10.1177/153537020322800205


18. Biswas, T. K., Pandit, S., Mondal, S., Biswas, S. K., Jana, U., Ghosh, T., . . . Auddy, B. (2010). Clinical evaluation of spermatogenic activity of processed Shilajit in oligospermia. Andrologia,42(1), 48-56. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0272.2009.00956.x


19. Surapaneni, D. K., Adapa, S. R., Preeti, K., Teja, G. R., Veeraragavan, M., & Krishnamurthy, S. (2012). Shilajit attenuates behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome by modulating the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and mitochondrial bioenergetics in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 143(1), 91-99. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2012.06.002


20. Chang, C. S., Choi, J. B., Kim, H. J., & Park, S. B. (2011). Correlation Between Serum Testosterone Level and Concentrations of Copper and Zinc in Hair Tissue. Biological Trace Element Research,144(1-3), 264-271. doi:10.1007/s12011-011-9085-y


21. Plasma Steroid-Binding Proteins in Tumour Diseases. (1984). Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 371-380. doi:10.1016/b978-0-08-033239-0.50032-6

[]