First 1,000-Year-Old Person Could Already Be Alive

Anti-aging expert Dr. Audrey de Gray is convinced that the first “to be” 1000-year-old man is already born.

But he’s clear it won’t be some “magic pill” that will automatically let someone live for 1000 years.

He believes it will be an incremental process, where the advancement of anti-aging technology will eventually outpace aging itself.

Basically, we’ll probably discover something that will extend the average lifespan by 30 years.

Then, before those 30 years are up, someone else will introduce a therapy that increases lifespan by, say, another 45 years.

And so on.

There could be people on Earth today that will be in the right time and place to catch this wave.

Dr. de Grey calls this the Longevity Escape Velocity.

He even has a helpful chart to help visualize the concept:

AI has now come into the picture as we are starting to see they can predict the effect of drugs on living organisms with incredible accuracy.

In fact, AI-powered recommendations have already successfully increased lifespan in mice by 30%.

Are humans next?

Needless to say, the topic of “ending aging” is controversial.

“1000 years? Wouldn’t it get boring?”

“Think of the abuse of power! 1000-year-old dictators? No thanks.”

“What about overpopulation?”

Common objections.

Anti-aging researchers will readily admit they don’t have satisfying answers for all these concerns yet. But like all major innovations, they believe we’ll figure it out as we go.

They believe that aging is just another disease, which makes finding the cure a noble pursuit. After all, no one goes out of their way to object to the cure for malaria, cancer, or Alzheimer’s.

Whatever your position on this topic, you must admit:

With all the doomsday storylines of AI and robots wiping out humanity, wouldn’t it be an ironic plot-twist if they end up increasing our time on the planet?

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