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Why Are You Drinking Estrogen Every Day?

You don’t have to get very far at any store before you come across water bottles or plastic containers with “BPA Free” stickers on them.

In case you’ve ever wondered what exactly BPA is and why it’s dangerous, here’s a quick rundown:

BPA stands for bisphenol A, and it has been used to make plastics in food packaging and other containers since the 1950s.

The problem is, BPA has been proven toxic. The use of BPA in some products (such as baby bottles) has even been banned in some countries.

It’s even been called the asbestos of this generation.

But here’s the kicker: BPA is also a xenoestrogen.

Xenoestrogens are chemical compounds in our environment that mimic the masculinity-killing hormone, estrogen.

While estrogen in men is normal in small amounts…

…we actually have estrogen receptors on almost every cell in our bodies…

Excess levels lead to breast growth, infertility, muscle shrinkage, weight gain, soft skin, facial hair loss, etc.

This is clearly a bad look for corporations who use BPA in their products.

Many companies that once used BPA have switched to a close analog: BPS. The problem is, BPS doesn’t seem to be any better.

In fact, it’s probably worse.

However, these corporations successfully save face by using a compound that isn’t perceived as being dangerous.

You’ve probably never seen a “BPS” sticker on a water bottle.

It’s the classic scenario of the devil you know vs. the devil you don’t.

A Canadian study found that BPS had comparable effects to BPA, but the effects set in much faster.

In fact, in a recent study on mice…it was shown to hinder heart function within minutes of a single exposure. [R]

Lead researcher, Dr. Glen Pyle, points out that this is especially concerning because the endocrine receptors and metabolic pathways are very similar in mice and humans.

Although our bodies are able to eject bisphenols pretty quickly, their persistent use in consumer goods along with the faster-acting analog, BPS, may increase exposure at a rate that is higher than our body’s ability to deal with them.

So, here’s what you can do:

1. Reduce your use of plastic.

Yes, even the “BPA Free” ones.

Arguably the most important switch you can make is ditching water bottles and water filters made out of plastic.

Drinking water, including tap and bottled water, is the largest source of plastic in our diet, with the average person consuming about 1,769 tiny microplastic particles each week, according to a 2019 report supported by WFF. [R]

2. Invest In Glass Containers

It’s a true game changer for your health and masculinity because glass is 100% BPA and BPS free.

Always use glass instead of plastic.

3. Don’t microwave plastic.

Even if it’s labelled microwave safe. It might not blow up your microwave, but that doesn’t mean it can’t melt and seep into your food.

And while you may not get rid of all your plastic containers cold-turkey, it may be wise to slowly make the transition to high quality containers free of both BPA and BPS:

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